Speaking Out: Women's Voices from Syria | Institute for War and Peace Reporting

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Speaking Out: Women's Voices from Syria

Women are among the hardest-hit by the war in Syria, yet many play vital roles in the struggle for human rights, gender equality, reconciliation and social justice.


IWPR’s Speaking Out project provides a space for female writers to share their experiences of daily life both in Syria or as refugees abroad. It is a platform where they can publish their views at a time when they struggle to be heard amid ongoing atrocities, mass displacement, collapsing public services, and personal tragedies.


The blog posts are written and published in Arabic and also translated into English for publication here and on IWPR’s Syria Stories website.

A group of displaced people wait at dawn at a train station. (Photo: Ahmad Khalil)
Doha Abbas
10 Oct 18
A woman follows her fighter husband to live among strangers.
PKK uses underage girls in hostilities. (Photo: Spodaren Roje/YPJ organisation)
Jullnar Abdul Kareem
29 Mar 18
Concerns that military forces are using child soldiers.
A woman returning to Syria from Jordan. (Photo: Mohammad Aba Zeid)
Hiba al-Aboud
26 Mar 18
A journey filled with bribes and interrogations.
Syrian kids playing in a street. (Photo: Syria Stories)
Shaima al-Fares
27 Feb 18
The brutal consequences of not meeting society's expectations.
(Photo: Syria Stories)
Aisha Sultan
23 Jan 18
An ordinary teenager, doomed to the fate of a social outcast.
IWPR
20 Dec 17
Staff and users defy bomb damage to continue their activities.
Shaher Awad
23 Nov 17
A peace workshop defies conservative local attitudes.
A woman walking through the Saif al-Dawla neighbourhood. (Photo: Hussam Kuwaifatiah)
Hala al-Abdullah
17 Nov 17
A young woman's dreams are shattered by the war.
A paramedic examines a child at the Syrian civil defence centre in Maarrat al-Nu'man. (Photo: IWPR)
Darin Hassan
26 Oct 17
Defying social prejudice to serve in the civil defence.
An elderly man from Zamalka. (Photo: IWPR)
Reem Said
24 Oct 17
It was a quiet morning. Then the bombing began.

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