Iraqi protesters gather at Tahrir square during ongoing anti-government demonstrations in the capital Baghdad on October 31, 2019.
Iraqi protesters gather at Tahrir square during ongoing anti-government demonstrations in the capital Baghdad on October 31, 2019. © AHMAD AL-RUBAYE/AFP via Getty Images

Driving Change

IWPR helps build more stable, just and inclusive societies

IWPR’s work focuses on three critical priorities

Producing Factual Content to Combat Disinformation

Disinformation is the challenge of our time, dividing societies, driving conflict and depriving citizens of their rights. IWPR’s central mission is to increase the production of content by local reporters and rights researchers to provide reliable content, build trust within societies and contribute to positive solutions.
 

Building Sustainable Local Groups

IWPR provides financial support, strategic and planning guidance and management advice and mentoring to help local media and civic groups remain vibrant, independent and sustainable to drive positive change for the long-term.
 

Tackling Human Rights Challenges

IWPR partners with reporters, rights advocates and local groups to mobilise the power of information to tackle critical challenges from violent extremist hate speech, to women’s and minority rights to disinformation and COVID-19 responses.

DRIVING CHANGE CASE STUDY #1

 

 

 

IWPR has strengthened local voices in more than 70 countries, helping them to build more stable, just and inclusive societies.

Fighting Corruption in Ukraine

A handbook produced by IWPR’s partners in Ukraine has become the go-to text for the country’s main anti-corruption body.

Anti-government protesters in Kiev calling for ousting of President Viktor Yanukovych over corruption and an abandoned trade agreement with the European Union, February 2014.
Anti-government protesters in Kiev calling for ousting of President Viktor Yanukovych over corruption and an abandoned trade agreement with the European Union, February 2014. © Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images

Combating corruption is key to the country’s future, and the specialised guide provides a uniquely integrated action plan for local government, journalists and activists alike.

“I keep it on my desk as a challenge for myself and my colleagues.”

Oleksandr Novikov Head of Ukraine’s National Agency on Corruption Prevention

Oleksandr Novikov, chairman of the National Agency for Prevention of Corruption of Ukraine with the Top 20 Local Corruption Schemes – How to Overcome Them handbook.
Oleksandr Novikov, chairman of the National Agency for Prevention of Corruption of Ukraine with the Top 20 Local Corruption Schemes – How to Overcome Them handbook. © IWPR

DRIVING CHANGE CASE STUDY #2

 

 

 

In the world’s most challenging environments, IWPR empowers responsible journalists and innovative civic activists, leveraging their voices to promote debate and mobilise citizen action.

Malala's IWPR Roots

Nobel Prize laureate Malala Yousafzai began her campaigning work as a 12-year-old IWPR trainee in a Pakistani programme empowering young people through public debate and dialogue.

“In IWPR's Open Minds, we students learned how to express ourselves and the problems of others through the media. We learned so much in the trainings.”

Malala Yousafzai Pakistani activist for female education and the youngest Nobel Prize laureate

Malala at age 12 talks about taking part in IWPR's Open Minds Pakistan project.

Malala Yousafzai at the Nobel Peace Prize ceremony, December 10, 2014 in Oslo, Norway.
Malala Yousafzai at the Nobel Peace Prize ceremony, December 10, 2014 in Oslo, Norway. © Nigel Waldron/Getty Images

“We are very proud of our trainee and profoundly motivated by her story, which shows the power of a single, determined local voice to have truly global impact.”

Anthony Borden IWPR Founder & Executive Director

DRIVING CHANGE CASE STUDY #3

 

 

 

IWPR extends sustainable constituencies for positive change, through new skills, networks, technology and social media, and other innovations.

Georgia: FGM Banned After IWPR Investigation

The Georgian government criminalised female genital mutilation (FGM) following an IWPR investigation that revealed the practice was ongoing in the east of the country.

Stop FGM illustration.
Stop FGM illustration. © Art-skvortsova

The authorities and human rights groups had all been previously unaware that ethnic Avars in the Kvareli district routinely carried out FGM on young girls. In response to IWPR’s article, an immediate campaign both outlawed the practice and raised public awareness.

Mufti of the Georgian Muslims Yasin Aliyev.
Mufti of the Georgian Muslims Yasin Aliyev. © State Agency for Religious Issues Georgia

“The Koran does not say that circumcision is a duty.”

Yasin Aliyev Mufti of the Georgian Muslims

"Raising awareness about FGM as a gross form of violence, and education about the health and other implications of FGM on girls and women is as important as banning such practice by law."

Erika Kvapilova UN Women

Many Avars say that FGM is an important part of their heritage.
Many Avars say that FGM is an important part of their heritage. © Aida Mirmaksumova
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