Kyrgyzstan | Institute for War and Peace Reporting

Kyrgyzstan

Journalists trained by IWPR produce news, analysis, and comment pieces on the issues that affect their countries and communities.

Global Voices

A punch bag as the symbol of domestic violence was removed from the exhibition. The committee found it provocative. (Photo courtesy of the Feminnale organisers)
9 Dec 19
Show highlighting women’s rights censored for offending local sensitivities.
Penal colony #27 in Moldovanovka village, not far from Bishkek. (Photo: Bolot Isaev/IWPR)
4 Nov 19
Experts call for comprehensive approach to deradicalising prisoners.
A member of audience going through the report. (Photo: CABAR/IWPR)
Project Highlight
2 Oct 19
Ground-breaking IWPR research shows how access to information is changing.
Bishkek-based expert Asel Murzakulova, has studied the issues along the Kyrgyz-Tajik border for several years. (Photo: Timur Toktonaliev/IWPR)
Interview
19 Sep 19
Tensions will continue until the leaders of both countries find political will to resolve the issue.
18 Sep 19
With no legal provision for self-defence as a mitigating factor, women who kill their relatives are almost always found guilty.
Almazbek Atambaev in Koi Tash. (Photo: AKIpress)
11 Aug 19
Experts say arrest only marks a temporary truce in an ongoing power struggle.
A madrasa in Kyrgyzstan. (Photo: muftiyat.kg)
23 Jul 19
Draft regulations aims to increase oversight and introduce practical skills into curricula.
Day-to-day civility conceals underlying mistrust between ethnic communities in southern Kyrgyzstan. Here, the central market in Osh, June 2011. (Photo: Pavel Gromsky)
Interview
13 Jun 19
Language and education could be key to improving relations.
CABAR organised meeting on sinology development in Kyrgyzstan. (Photo: CABAR.asia)
Project Highlight
3 Mar 19
Event hears that investing in sinology is a national interest.
Kyrgyz activists protest against camps in China in front of the UN House in Bishkek. (Photo: RFE RL Kyrgyz service)
22 Jan 19
Mass release of detainees stirs hopes that international criticism may be working.

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