Institute for War and Peace Reporting | Giving Voice, Driving Change

IWPR Summer School Wraps Up in Bishkek

Twenty specialists took part in classes run by regional and international trainers.
  • Participants from four Central Asia countries Uzbekistan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan and Kazakstan. (Photo: CABAR/IWPR)
    Participants from four Central Asia countries Uzbekistan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan and Kazakstan. (Photo: CABAR/IWPR)
  • Young analysts from Tajikistan. (Photo: CABAR/IWPR)
    Young analysts from Tajikistan. (Photo: CABAR/IWPR)
  • Participants from four Central Asia countries Uzbekistan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan and Kazakstan. (Photo: CABAR/IWPR)
    Participants from four Central Asia countries Uzbekistan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan and Kazakstan. (Photo: CABAR/IWPR)
  • Participants represent different governments and independent think-tanks as well as independent researchers. (Photo: CABAR/IWPR)
    Participants represent different governments and independent think-tanks as well as independent researchers. (Photo: CABAR/IWPR)
  • Participants from Uzbekistan. (Photo: CABAR/IWPR)
    Participants from Uzbekistan. (Photo: CABAR/IWPR)
  • Participants from Tajikistan. (Photo: CABAR/IWPR)
    Participants from Tajikistan. (Photo: CABAR/IWPR)
  • In addition to training the program includes mentorship, networking and internships. (Photo: CABAR/IWPR)
    In addition to training the program includes mentorship, networking and internships. (Photo: CABAR/IWPR)

IWPR and the OSCE Academy in Bishkek wrapped up a week-long summer programme for aspiring young Central Asian analysts.

Twenty specialists from Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, and Uzbekistan took part in a series of workshops that included writing policy papers and processing visual materials.

Organized under the Giving Voice, Driving Change - from the Borderland to the Steppes project, the programme was implemented with financial support from the Norwegian ministry of foreign affairs through the Analytics School CABAR.asia.

Trainers were drawn from the region and further afield, including Elmira Nogoibaeva, head of the Krygyz Policy Asia centre who lectured on how political anlaysis could affect public discourse.

Emil Juraev, an associate professor of the OSCE Academy in Bishkek and Kairat Moldashev, a lecturer at Kazakhstan’s Narxoz University, explained the basic structure, standards, and methodology of writing analytical reports.

International trainers included Noah Tucker, an associate at George Washington University’s Elliot School of International Affairs Central Asia Programme.

A Skype session was also organized with Roman Vakulchuk from the Norwegian Institute of International Relations and Edward Lemon, professor in the department of political science at Columbia University.

Participants also gave interactive presentations and had the opportunity to share insights into their own country’s culture and tradition.

A separate day was devoted to methods of data collection and processing, as well as visualisation tools.

Dilmurad Yusupov, a participant from Uzbekistan, said, "Before taking part in this school, I didn’t really consider writing analytical articles for a wide audience because I thought that I wasn’t yet ready for this kind of activity and it always seemed to me that people who write public analyses were only engaged in self-promotion."

A participant from Kyrgyzstan, Roza Duysheyeva, said, “The programme’s busy schedule met all our expectations and will have an effect on our shared goals to become useful, successful analysts of topical regional issues.

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