IWPR Investigation Highlighted by Global Network

Article revealed massive corruption in Tajikistan’s car safety system.

IWPR Investigation Highlighted by Global Network

Article revealed massive corruption in Tajikistan’s car safety system.

Saturday, 27 February, 2021

An IWPR investigation into how millions of dollars were being siphoned off from mandatory vehicle inspections in Tajikistan was selected as one of the Global Investigative Journalism Network (GIJN) top stories of February.

The article, originally published on IWPR’s analytical portal CABAR.asia, detailed how the company responsible for checks had failed to even assess vehicles’ safety but simply issued certification in exchange for payment.

Its IWPR-trained author, Yoqub Halimov, last year won first place at the First Central Asian MediaCAMP Fest in Dushanbe for another high-impact investigation into how a senior official was selling off discounted real estate.

Halimov said that the problem of corruption was highly relevant for many other countries in the region.

“That’s why research and coverage of such problems resonates with neighbouring and the post-Soviet states,” he continued. “Another reason why the media republish my investigations is the fact that I try to conduct them in accordance with international requirements, norms and standards. Each letter, word and sentence are confirmed with documents and facts.”

He said that investigative journalism was a key way to stop violations and bring those responsible to justice.

“After publication, they should get what they deserve in order to prevent further corruption and illegal actions,” he continued. “Unfortunately, we have not yet reached this stage, but all our efforts will be aimed at achieving these goals.”

Last year, GIJN republished another CABAR.asia investigation on preventing extremism in Tajikistan’s prisons which they recommended as setting a standard for investigative journalists

This publication was prepared under the "Giving Voice, Driving Change - from the Borderland to the Steppes Project" implemented with the financial support of the Foreign Ministry of Norway.

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