Institute for War and Peace Reporting | Giving Voice, Driving Change

Qamishli's Museum of Kurdish Heritage

Collection is filled with dozens of antique items collected over two decades.
By Shafan Ibrahim
  • Copper items and glassware. (Photo: Shafan Ibrahim)
    Copper items and glassware. (Photo: Shafan Ibrahim)
  • Tools Kurdish farmers and shepherds once used. (Photo: Shafan Ibrahim)
    Tools Kurdish farmers and shepherds once used. (Photo: Shafan Ibrahim)
  • A display portraying how food was cooked. (Photo: Shafan Ibrahim)
    A display portraying how food was cooked. (Photo: Shafan Ibrahim)
  • Wooden tools. (Photo: Shafan Ibrahim)
    Wooden tools. (Photo: Shafan Ibrahim)
  • Ploughing tools once used by farmers. (Photo: Shafan Ibrahim)
    Ploughing tools once used by farmers. (Photo: Shafan Ibrahim)
  • Both young and old visited the exhibition. (Photo: Shafan Ibrahim)
    Both young and old visited the exhibition. (Photo: Shafan Ibrahim)
  • A Kurdish bridal trousseau. (Photo: Shafan Ibrahim)
    A Kurdish bridal trousseau. (Photo: Shafan Ibrahim)
  • Exhibition poster: Martyr Farhad’s Museum of Kurdish Heritage. (Photo: Shafan Ibrahim)
    Exhibition poster: Martyr Farhad’s Museum of Kurdish Heritage. (Photo: Shafan Ibrahim)

Mohammed Sabri founded the Martyr Farhad’s Museum of Kurdish Heritage in Qamishli two years ago.

The museum, portrays the traditional Kurdish way of life and is named in honour of his son Farhad.

Filled with antique items Sabri has collected over the past two decades, the exhibits include weapons, hunting and construction tools, as well as objects bought by Kurdish brides-to-be as part of their trousseau.

For the past two years Sabri has opened the doors of his private museum to the general public for three days each week.

His visitors have included politicians and civil society activists, but Sabri told Damascus Bureau that he was particularly happy when young people came to the museum.

He said he took great pleasure in telling them all about Kurdish history, heritage and folklore.

Damascus Bureau’s Shafan Ibrahim visited the Martyr Farhad’s Museum of Kurdish Heritage and took the above photographs.

More IWPR's Global Voices