Institute for War and Peace Reporting | Giving Voice, Driving Change

Justice Show Back on Ugandan Airwaves

New series of IWPR’s human rights and justice programme to air in the north of the country.
By IWPR

IWPR’s radio programme Facing Justice will return for a new series on five local stations in northern Uganda from November 5, 2010.

Facing Justice is IWPR’s feature-length radio production discussing issues of human rights and justice in northern Uganda.

The programme will be broadcast weekly in Teso, Lango, Acholi and West Nile sub-regions and can be heard in English and three local languages: Luo, Ateso and Lugbara.

Facing Justice is part of IWPR’s efforts to provide reliable and objective information on issues affecting the daily lives of Ugandans in the north of the country. “We believe that the local journalists can give the population access to vital information that is needed in the recovery efforts in northern Uganda,” IWPR’s Executive Director Anthony Borden said.

The radio show comprises in-depth reports from IWPR-trained reporters across northern Uganda and contributes to building long-term stability in the post-conflict era.

The Facing Justice programme in Uganda is part of IWPR’s successful series of justice and human rights reporting in Sudan, the Democratic Republic of Congo and the former Yugoslavia. It will be broadcast on five radio stations who have partnered with IWPR in the project: Mega FM in Gulu, Radio Palwak in Rackoko, Radio Pacis in Arua, Radio Rhino in Lira and Voice of Teso in Soroti.

According to local studies, up to 90 per cent of the population of northern Uganda listens to radio every day. IWPR’s partner stations expect the new programme to play a crucial role in providing their audiences with vital information and viewpoints on subjects related to the post-conflict landscape in northern Uganda.

Facing Justice welcomes listeners’ questions and comments. Please email the programme at facingjustice@gmail.com or sms or call 078 4762 284 with your comments. 

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