Tajikistan Looks South

A four-party summit in Dushanbe has raised expectations that Tajikistan can engage more with southern neighbours Afghanistan and Pakistan.

Tajikistan Looks South

A four-party summit in Dushanbe has raised expectations that Tajikistan can engage more with southern neighbours Afghanistan and Pakistan.

Friday, 14 August, 2009
The presidents of these three states plus Russia met on July 30 to discuss issues ranging from counter-narcotics and counter-terrorism measures to the prospects for economic cooperation. They signed up to an agreement proposing a common energy market for Central and South Asia.



Reporter Shahodat Saibnazarova found that analysts in Tajikistan hailed the meeting as of benefit to all the states concerned, but to their own in particular.



Rashidghani Abdullo, for example, noted that landlocked Tajikistan could not only gain access to Pakistani ports, but could shift from relying on aluminium and cotton exports to selling hydroelectric power to the Afghans and Pakistanis, who will be in a position to pay for it.



Russia , too, has a material interest in tying up electricity deals with the south as it has invested heavily in the Sangtuda-1 power station and will want it to start paying for itself.
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