Institute for War and Peace Reporting | Giving Voice, Driving Change

A Question of Rights

The constitution protects the rights of women, but they feel discriminated against nonetheless.
By IWPR
In this episode, Asma al-Ameri in Erbil produced a vox pop in which teachers and students at the local law college were asked whether they thought the constitution guaranteed the rights of women. Midia Hushiar, a teacher, said it could not overcome the discrimination women faced. Yusra Ahmed, a student, said the main problem is that rights are not being enforced.



Ammar Salih in Basra spoke about Iraqi women's lack of legal knowledge. He said that they often suffered economic and social difficulties because they are not aware of the laws that might protect their rights, especially in divorce and inheritance cases.



Koral Tofiq in Sulaimanyah reported on laws introduced by the Kurdish authorities after 1991 to outlaw honour killings. And this episode of the The Other Half ended with an interview with Almas Fadhil, member of the Kirkuk provincial council, who explained the legal mechanisms that could help to guarantee women's rights.

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