Institute for War and Peace Reporting | Giving Voice, Driving Change

Encouraging Integration Through Art

New project develops skills of aspiring female artists.
By Bukhityar Hassan
  • Visitors admire the artwork. (Photo: Bukhityar Hassan)
    Visitors admire the artwork. (Photo: Bukhityar Hassan)
  • Event organisers officially open the exhibition. (Photo: Bukhityar Hassan)
    Event organisers officially open the exhibition. (Photo: Bukhityar Hassan)
  • Girls and young women participated in the event. (Photo: Bukhityar Hassan)
    Girls and young women participated in the event. (Photo: Bukhityar Hassan)
  • The one-day exhibition attracted activists and members of civil society organisations. (Photo: Bukhityar Hassan)
    The one-day exhibition attracted activists and members of civil society organisations. (Photo: Bukhityar Hassan)
  • Girls of various ages participated in creating the exhibition artwork. (Photo: Bukhityar Hassan)
    Girls of various ages participated in creating the exhibition artwork. (Photo: Bukhityar Hassan)
  • A group of children talk to a participant about her artwork. (Photo: Bukhityar Hassan)
    A group of children talk to a participant about her artwork. (Photo: Bukhityar Hassan)
  • Participants stand beside their artwork. (Photo: Bukhityar Hassan)
    Participants stand beside their artwork. (Photo: Bukhityar Hassan)
  • Participants engage in conversations with visitors. (Photo: Bukhityar Hassan)
    Participants engage in conversations with visitors. (Photo: Bukhityar Hassan)
  • Children’s artwork. (Photo: Bukhityar Hassan)
    Children’s artwork. (Photo: Bukhityar Hassan)
  • Final preparations for the award ceremony. (Photo: Bukhityar Hassan)
    Final preparations for the award ceremony. (Photo: Bukhityar Hassan)
  • Winners receive their prizes. (Photo: Bukhityar Hassan)
    Winners receive their prizes. (Photo: Bukhityar Hassan)

An exhibition at the Nowruz centre for the revival of civil society in the city of Amuda has provided a platform for displaced girls and young women to display their artwork.

Entitled The Song of the Flute, the event was sponsored by the organisation for Children and Young People and the Shabakit Aman organisation.

More than 300,000 internally displaced people (IDPs) now live in northeastern Syrian cities such as Amuda, Qamishli and Hassakah. They come mainly from Deir al-Zor, Aleppo and Raqqa.

Ahead of the exhibition, participants attended a five-day workshop in which they were taught how to create art out of unwanted household objects such as jars and boxes.   

The event aimed to boost the morale and confidence of internally displaced women and girls, as well as encouraging them to integrate into society and develop their artistic skills.

A total of 17 girls and young women took part in the exhibition, which concluded with the distribution of awards to the creators of the top four works of art as voted for by attendees.

Damascus Bureau’s Bukhityar Hassan visited the exhibition and took the above photographs.