Central Asia Radio | Institute for War and Peace Reporting

Programme

Central Asia Radio

IWPR's weekly radio programmes for Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan provide 15 minutes of analysis and comment on current political and social themes in each country.

The programmes go out in Russian and in Tajik or Kyrgyz, and to ensure that all listeners can hear them, they are being carried by established broadcast networks with maximum reach in each country – the National Radio and Television Corporation of Kyrgyzstan (NTRK), the Radio and Television Association of Kyrgyzstan, and also stations in Tajikistan.

Production Team: Bishkek editor: Sabyr Abdymomunov; Dushanbe editor: Shahodat Saibnazarova. Broadcasting Terms: Rebroadcasting of Central Asia Radio programmes is subject to written approval from IWPR.

Latest

Dates active: 
2008 to 2014
Zarina Ergasheva
27 Jul 10
Mehrangez Tursunzoda
27 Jul 10
Nurlan Abdaliev
13 Apr 10
As the interim government in Kyrgyzstan stripped Kurmanbek Bakiev of his presidential immunity, IWPR asked politicians and experts whether the country’s new leaders had enough legitimacy to do so.
IWPR
7 Mar 10
As expected, the People’s Democratic Party of Tajikistan won a clear majority in the February 28 parliamentary election, but its opponents are convinced the count was rigged.
IWPR Central Asia
7 Mar 10
Khalil Qayumzoda reports on the implications of a change in the law that will reduce the powers of prosecutors.
IWPR Central Asia
7 Mar 10
Aidai Tokonova reports on a campaign to make it easier for disabled people to use public transport, largely by showing other passengers how they can help.
IWPR Central Asia
7 Mar 10
Some web users now favour the idea of self-regulation as a better option than government intervention, Nuraim Ryskulova reports.
IWPR Central Asia
6 Mar 10
Residents of an area in the capital where homes were knocked down by the state say they are receiving little or no compensation, Mehrangiz Tursunzoda reports.
IWPR Central Asia
26 Feb 10
While people in Kyrgyzstan’s urban centres celebrated Valentine’s Day like everyone else, those in remoter areas were more reticent, fearing that expressing their feelings would transgress strongly-held traditional values.

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