Global Voices - Primary Level Training Programme | Institute for War and Peace Reporting

Global VoicesTraining & Resources

Primary Level Training Programme

The primary level training programme is a three- to four-month course with several stages:

  1. Induction: The approved trainee is accepted into the IWPR training programme and made familiar with its goals, expectations and schedule;
     
  2. Preliminary article cycle: The trainee and editor-trainers work through one full article cycle, from commissioning brief to final article evaluation;
     
  3. First assessment: Based on the experience of that first article cycle, IWPR editor-trainers identify the training needs of each individual trainee;
     
  4. Three article cycles: The trainee and editor-trainers work through three more article cycles, including commissioning briefs and article evaluations;
     
  5. Seminars and workshops: The trainee takes part in all local workshops and roundtables organised by IWPR during the training period, plus any other local workshops or seminars recommended by the country project manager. These others may be those of our partner organisations, local universities or other NGOs in related fields;
     
  6. Additional fieldwork: The IWPR country project manager will assign trainees additional work during the training period, the goal of which is to expose the trainee to as much journalistic work as possible, and give the trainee some contact with both local and international media. This work will include, but is not limited to:
     
    • Shadowing an experienced journalist for one week;
       
    • Visiting editorial offices in country;
       
    • Preparing and undertaking a practice interview;
       
    • Preparing and conducting a vox pop with a limited set of questions.
       
  7. Full personal review: The IWPR country project manager writes an individualised assessment of the trainee's work over the course, sending it to the regional project manager. If there is a significant amount of material in English, a London-based IWPR editor-trainer or international senior evaluator will also evaluate all the written work by the trainee.

    In this personal review, the IWPR country project manager will declare whether the trainee's progress can be considered "satisfactory," in which case he or she is given the IWPR Training Certificate (primary level) and becomes an occasional IWPR contributor. If the progress is seen as "unsatisfactory," the IWPR country project manager should recommend a course of action, either further article/evaluation cycles or release from the programme;
     
  8. Recognition: Trainees found to have completed the course satisfactorily will receive the IWPR Training Certificate (primary level).

Class sizes are kept small (five to ten trainees) to maximise the attention given to each trainee by IWPR's editor-trainers.