Promoting Human Rights and Good Governance in Afghanistan | Institute for War and Peace Reporting

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Promoting Human Rights and Good Governance in Afghanistan

With the withdrawal of NATO-led combat troops and a new government led by President Mohammad Ashraf Ghani in 2014, Afghanistan continues to face huge challenges. The presidential election was a protracted process that itself caused uncertainty. According to Human Rights Watch, the troubled political transition, coupled with growing pressure from Taleban insurgents, contributed to a further deterioration in respect for human rights nationwide, including impunity for abuses committed by all military forces, indiscriminate attacks resulting in civilian deaths, and threats to women’s rights and freedom of expression.

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Despite the rapid development of independent media since the collapse of the Taleban regime in 2001, and the increased number of Afghans working as professional journalists, human rights abuses remain largely unreported. This is largely due to reporters lacking the capacity to investigate the issues, fear of reprisals, and that fact that some media outlets are controlled by warlords. As a result, investigative journalism remains weak, and few outlets have the skills, resources, or sometimes the will to undertake balanced, in-depth reporting. 

To address these issues, IWPR has launched an initiative aimed at Promoting Human Rights and Good Governance in Afghanistan, designed to develop the capacity and willingness of Afghan media to engage with human rights issues. The programme is funded by the European Union Delegation to Afghanistan.

The main aims of this intervention are:

  • Greater capacity of journalists and editors to conduct investigative journalism;
  • Higher number of in-depth reports produced on human rights matters;
  • Greater civil society engagement with human rights issues;
  • Improved independent human rights monitoring;
  • Support for wider efforts to advance human rights, good governance and rule of law;
  • Building capacity for collective action on critical issues, particularly among traditionally marginalised groups (including women and young people) and among communities living outside major urban centres. 
Shamil Ahmad Mashal
20 Aug 17
Event hears that 60 per cent of local residents cannot find work.
Farid Tanha
17 Aug 17
Event hears of disturbing trend that has put health care workers at increasing risk.
A woman with children in Nuristan province, Afghanistan. (Photo: Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
Sahib Daad Hamdard
11 Aug 17
In remote Nuristan, ancient tradition decrees that it’s female family members who have to do the heavy lifting.
IWPR debate on human rights held on July 25 in Faizabad city. (Photo: IWPR)
Baseera Seerat
2 Aug 17
All parties urged to respect non-combatants and observe the rules of war.
Residents of Nuristan province demanded improved health services in a debate organised by IWPR in Paron on July 29. (Photo: IWPR)
Khan Zali Feroz
2 Aug 17
Event hears that serious measures are needed to deal with the shortfall.
Khairullah Zaki
31 Jul 17
The Taleban and other groups find it easy to exploit vulnerable minors
Sediqullah Afghan
27 Jul 17
Event hears how government and insurgent forces alike routinely abuse civilians.
Female lawmakers in the Afghan parliament. (Photo: Eric Kanalstein/Getty Images)
Mina Habib
8 Jun 17
Statistics showing rising numbers of female officials do not tell the whole story.
Women and children hide in a corner as their home is searched during a raid by the Afghan National Army. (Photo: Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
Aziz Abdel Maqsoud
15 May 17
Counter-terror tactic seen as an unacceptable violation of privacy with long-term consequences.
An Afghan pharmacist talks to a young customer. (Photo: Paula Bronstein/Getty Images)
Zamzama
8 May 17
Trade in out-of-date or counterfeit medication is booming in country’s east.

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