Promoting Human Rights and Good Governance in Afghanistan | Institute for War and Peace Reporting

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Promoting Human Rights and Good Governance in Afghanistan

With the withdrawal of NATO-led combat troops and a new government led by President Mohammad Ashraf Ghani in 2014, Afghanistan continues to face huge challenges. The presidential election was a protracted process that itself caused uncertainty. According to Human Rights Watch, the troubled political transition, coupled with growing pressure from Taleban insurgents, contributed to a further deterioration in respect for human rights nationwide, including impunity for abuses committed by all military forces, indiscriminate attacks resulting in civilian deaths, and threats to women’s rights and freedom of expression.

 

Despite the rapid development of independent media since the collapse of the Taleban regime in 2001, and the increased number of Afghans working as professional journalists, human rights abuses remain largely unreported. This is largely due to reporters lacking the capacity to investigate the issues, fear of reprisals, and that fact that some media outlets are controlled by warlords. As a result, investigative journalism remains weak, and few outlets have the skills, resources, or sometimes the will to undertake balanced, in-depth reporting. 

 

To address these issues, IWPR has launched an initiative aimed at Promoting Human Rights and Good Governance in Afghanistan, designed to develop the capacity and willingness of Afghan media to engage with human rights issues. The programme is funded by the European Union Delegation to Afghanistan.

 

The main aims of this intervention are:

  • Greater capacity of journalists and editors to conduct investigative journalism;
  • Higher number of in-depth reports produced on human rights matters;
  • Greater civil society engagement with human rights issues;
  • Improved independent human rights monitoring;
  • Support for wider efforts to advance human rights, good governance and rule of law;
  • Building capacity for collective action on critical issues, particularly among traditionally marginalised groups (including women and young people) and among communities living outside major urban centres. 
Zarghona Salihi
16 Jan 17
Penal code allows men to claim extenuating circumstances in cases of so-called honour killings.
Mohammad Hamid Hashimi
13 Jan 17
Debate hears of “staggering” amount of damage caused to the system.
A former drug addict at the Sanga Amaj Drug Treatment Center in Kabul. (Photo: Paula Bronstein/Getty Images)
Sodaba Ahrari
12 Jan 17
Experts say a major reason is the influence of a husband or other male authority figure within the family.
Afghan women wait in line to be treated at a health clinic in Kalakan, Afghanistan. (Photo by Paula Bronstein/Getty Images)
Pazhman Pazhohish
11 Jan 17
Campaigners say that women are routinely victimised and subjected to traumatic and invasive tests.
A mosque in Kabul. (Photo: Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
Qayum Babak
4 Jan 17
Residents of northern city say noise pollution is making their lives a misery.
An Afghan woman's face is caught in the light at the Karti Sakhi shrine in Kabul. (Photo: Paula Bronstein/Getty Images)
Salma Rasa
16 Dec 16
Despite a government crackdown, supernatural practices remain as popular as ever in Afghanistan.
Kids collect garbage on the streets of Kabul to help their families. (Photo: Paula Bronstein/Getty Images)
Pazhman Pazhohish
9 Dec 16
Tens of thousands beg or sell trinkets rather than attending school.
Afghan students in the Khost province are being forced to attend government-organised demonstrations and ceremonies. (Photo: Natalie Behring-Chisholm/Getty Images)
Ahmad Shah
8 Dec 16
Young people resentful at being pulled out of school to boost crowds at public events.
Women work on textiles during vocational training in Kabul. (Photo: Majid Saeedi/Getty Images)
Ahmad Shah
8 Dec 16
Concerns that schemes designed to help women become economically self-sufficient have been abandoned.
Gender rights activists in Herat province warn that rates of child marriage are on the rise. (Photo: Majid Saeedi/Getty Images)
Sohdaba Ehrari
7 Dec 16
Activists warn that public awareness campaigns are having little impact.

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