Promoting Human Rights and Good Governance in Afghanistan | Institute for War and Peace Reporting

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Promoting Human Rights and Good Governance in Afghanistan

With the withdrawal of NATO-led combat troops and a new government led by President Mohammad Ashraf Ghani in 2014, Afghanistan continues to face huge challenges. The presidential election was a protracted process that itself caused uncertainty. According to Human Rights Watch, the troubled political transition, coupled with growing pressure from Taleban insurgents, contributed to a further deterioration in respect for human rights nationwide, including impunity for abuses committed by all military forces, indiscriminate attacks resulting in civilian deaths, and threats to women’s rights and freedom of expression.

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Despite the rapid development of independent media since the collapse of the Taleban regime in 2001, and the increased number of Afghans working as professional journalists, human rights abuses remain largely unreported. This is largely due to reporters lacking the capacity to investigate the issues, fear of reprisals, and that fact that some media outlets are controlled by warlords. As a result, investigative journalism remains weak, and few outlets have the skills, resources, or sometimes the will to undertake balanced, in-depth reporting. 

To address these issues, IWPR has launched an initiative aimed at Promoting Human Rights and Good Governance in Afghanistan, designed to develop the capacity and willingness of Afghan media to engage with human rights issues. The programme is funded by the European Union Delegation to Afghanistan.

The main aims of this intervention are:

  • Greater capacity of journalists and editors to conduct investigative journalism;
  • Higher number of in-depth reports produced on human rights matters;
  • Greater civil society engagement with human rights issues;
  • Improved independent human rights monitoring;
  • Support for wider efforts to advance human rights, good governance and rule of law;
  • Building capacity for collective action on critical issues, particularly among traditionally marginalised groups (including women and young people) and among communities living outside major urban centres. 
Female lawmakers in the Afghan parliament. (Photo: Eric Kanalstein/Getty Images)
Mina Habib
8 Jun 17
Statistics showing rising numbers of female officials do not tell the whole story.
Women and children hide in a corner as their home is searched during a raid by the Afghan National Army. (Photo: Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
Aziz Abdel Maqsoud
15 May 17
Counter-terror tactic seen as an unacceptable violation of privacy with long-term consequences.
An Afghan pharmacist talks to a young customer. (Photo: Paula Bronstein/Getty Images)
Zamzama
8 May 17
Trade in out-of-date or counterfeit medication is booming in country’s east.
A malnurished baby is measured to monitor her growth at a hospital in Kabul. (Photo: Paula Bronstein/Getty Images)
Mohammad Ibrahim Spesalai
27 Apr 17
Increased fighting and an ongoing economic downturn are leaving many at risk of serious health problems.
Bamiyan shelter and safe house cares for battered Afghan women. (Photo: Paula Bronstein/Getty Images)
Salma Rasa
20 Apr 17
The whole concept of such shelters remains controversial in this deeply conservative country.
Women in burqas walk in front of the ruins of Darulaman Palace in Kabul. (Photo: Paula Bronstein/Getty Images)
Salma Rasad
18 Apr 17
Groundbreaking project showcases women’s achievements in a male-dominated industry.
Afghan war amputees and children practice walking at the ICRC orthopaedic centre in Kabul. (Photo: John Moore/Getty Images)
Farid Tanha
6 Apr 17
Disabled people say they face social prejudice and government inaction.
Afghans wait for treatment at a clinic near Kabul. (Photo: Majid Saeedi/Getty Images)
Marzia Husseini
29 Mar 17
Breast cancer is the second most common cause of death for Afghan women, but there is little public awareness of the disease.
A female inmate peers out the front door as she waits to be released from the women's prison in Kabul. (Photo: Paula Bronstein/Getty Images)
Zabiullah Mobariz
28 Mar 17
Prisoners say they are harassed by police officers and justice officials alike.
Zamzama
27 Mar 17
Without officials papers it’s impossible to vote, travel or get medical care.

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