Political reform

Central Asia: 20 Years of Independence

 

As the Soviet Union broke up in 1991, the five Central Asian republics suddenly found themselves independent states, facing numerous challenges in creating a sense of nationhood and building separate economic structures. To mark the two decades since the five new states came into being, IWPR is publishing a series of articles highlighting the common challenges facing them, and some of the ways in which their paths have diverged over the years.

Outgoing prime minister Tigran Sargsyan. (Photo: Photolure agency)
11 Apr 14
Tigran Sargsyan presided over unpopular reforms, and also worked on failed efforts to move closer to Europe.
28 Mar 14
Leaked emails used to claim that some senior figures in Baku are linked to influential Turkish cleric.
Tbilisi city council chairman Irakli Shikhiashvili. (Photo: Tbilisi assembly website)
1 Feb 14
Ruling party using its control of Tbilisi’s elected assembly to pressure mayoral office.
17 Jan 14
United National Movement has survived two election defeats to become serious opposition force.
Poster of Heydar Aliyev in Sumgait. The words say "I will be in Azerbaijan forever”. (Photo: Shahla Sultanova)
17 Dec 13
Ten years after his death, Heydar Aliyev still looms large over the country.
The speaker of Georgia's parliament, David Usupashvili, mounted a robust defence of the local government reform bill. (Photo: Georgian parliament website)
16 Dec 13
Influential church leader warns devolution means separatism. “Nonsense”, say critics.
The speaker of Georgia's parliament, David Usupashvili, mounted a robust defence of the local government reform bill. (Photo: Georgian parliament website) Rebel fighters outside Bin Jawad, March  2011. (Photo: Nasser Nouri)
Парламент Узбекистана. (Фото: NBCA) Opposition leader Mehdi Karroubi (left) with former Tehran mayor Gholam-Hossein Karbaschi (right). The latter is head of the opposition Kargozaran party and has just been allowed to start publishing his newspaper again. (Photo: Raoof Mohseni, Mehr News Agency) A statue of Egyptian president Hosni Mubarak has taken centre stage as Azerbaijani opposition leaders compare the situation at home to the conditions that sparked mass unrest in Cairo. (Photo: Samira Ahmedbeyli)
Those who took part in the January uprising now feel let down by the transitional government. (Photo: Nasser Nouri/Flickr) Political banners at a protest in Tunis. The upper one says “I’m Muslim, I’m Tunisian, I’m against Ennahda”, while the one below says “We won’t accept a second RCD” – a reference to ousted President Ben Ali’s ruling party. (Photo: Fouad Hamdan)
A CDR (Committee for the Defence of the Revolution) logo on an apartment building. (Photo: Abraham Orozco/Flickr) Poster of Heydar Aliyev in Sumgait. The words say "I will be in Azerbaijan forever”. (Photo: Shahla Sultanova) Tunisian national flags fly over government buildings in the capital Tunis. (Photo: Cernavoda/Flickr) Nurali Davlatov, a political analyst in Tajikistan. (Photo courtesy of N. Davlatov)