Report News ›› The Arab Spring ›› Libya: Media in Transition

Developed Resources and Tools

Related handbooks and printed materials produced by IWPR.

Arabic

Election reporting is, in essence, no different from any other form of reporting. But during election campaigns, the media as well as politicians come under even more intense scrutiny than usual, as the public follows the news with greater interest than normal. Any report is monitored for possible bias, distortion or inaccuracies. In such an atmosphere, journalists and editors have to maintain even more care and diligence than usual. This is when the good habits of impartial reporting, fact-checking and reliable sourcing really come into their own. This handbook is a practical guide for journalists reporting on elections in Libya, and is based on IWPR’s wide experience of training and working with reporters in the Middle East and in Africa, Europe and Asia.


English, Arabic, Russian, Kazakh, Kyrgyz and Tajik

Handbook for Local Journalists in Crisis Areas is a practical guide for journalists in crisis areas, which is based on IWPR’s wide experience of training and working with journalists in Europe, Asia, the Middle East and Africa. The handbook teaches international reporting standards, explaining the journalistic process clearly, from subject choice to final editing. The modules are enhanced with examples and extracts from previously published IWPR stories from around the world.


Arabic

The internet has become a vital channel for the free flow of information across the Arab world, and has been taken up by tens of thousands of bloggers and journalists. But as the number of web users striving for greater freedom of expression grows, repressive governments have become more aware of this aspect of the internet, and have increased their own capacity to track, harass and threaten those who use it. In this cat-and-mouse game, many bloggers and human rights activists in the region remain under-informed about the security threats they face when using modern communication technology. Cyber-Arabs, a new magazine on digital security in the Arab World, will seek to narrow this knowledge gap by providing comprehensive, easy-to-understand information in Arabic about the key issues, and guidance on how to stay safe when working online.


French

Election reporting is, in essence, no different from any other form of reporting. But during election campaigns, the media as well as politicians come under even more intense scrutiny than usual, as the public follows the news with greater interest than normal. Any report is monitored for possible bias, distortion or inaccuracies. In such an atmosphere, journalists and editors have to maintain even more care and diligence than usual. This is when the good habits of impartial reporting, fact-checking and reliable sourcing really come into their own. This handbook is a practical guide for journalists reporting on elections in Tunisia, and is based on IWPR’s wide experience of training and working with reporters in the Middle East and in Africa, Europe and Asia.


Arabic

Dots on Letters is a youth periodical that highlights issues and problems of concern to local communities in Lebanon, particularly, in those pertaining to the municipalities of Tripoli, Sour, Baakline, Bikfaya and the suburbs of Beirut.


Arabic, Kurdish

In 2009, IWPR Iraq launched a newspaper covering a series of elections across the country, offering comprehensive reporting on ballot-related politics and news for readers nationwide. Metro published during the months of Jan-Feb and Jul-Aug in 2009 and again in Feb-Apr 2010, to coincide with provincial, Kurdish and parliamentary elections respectively. The newspaper presented news reports, analysis, comment and photojournalism in a tabloid format. It delivered authoritative reporting of election issues while training Iraqi journalists and editors in the production of a high-quality daily.


English

Digital communication has become a more perilous activity, particularly for activists, political dissidents, and independent media. The recent surge in digital activism that has helped to shape the Arab spring has been met with stiff resistance by governments in the region. In this report, commissioned by IWPR, we describe the results of a survey of 98 bloggers in the Middle East and North Africa carried out in May 2011 in order to study bloggers’ perceptions of online risk and the actions they take to address digital communications security, including both Internet and cell phone use.


English, Arabic

This manual for Sudanese journalists is aimed at increasing local capacity for court reporting and tackling issues relating to international justice and local trials.
Drawing on IWPR’s training experience in other countries in which the International Criminal Court is active, such as Uganda and the Democratic Republic of Congo, the manual takes journalists through all the steps necessary to understand international justice and produce balanced, accurate stories on the subject and related issues.


English

This Course Handbook has been produced to accompany the Uganda Radio Network Advanced Radio Journalism Course, which is being run throughout Uganda for freelance radio journalists in 2005 and 2006. The Handbook, which follows the day-by-day course programme, contains transcripts of PowerPoint presentations plus additional supporting material. It is important to note that the material presented in text boxes represents the PowerPoint presentations and can only be properly understood in the context of the course itself.


English

The handbook reviews reporting on general, political and human rights issues. It has sections on location recording and computer based audio editing. It provides guidance on safety and security and sensitive reporting in conflict areas, as well as libel issues. Developed out of the radio journalism workshops that were run as part of IWPR's Uganda Radio Network project, it also reviews the particular requirements for reporting for IWPR.