Typhoon Haiyan: The IWPR Response and How You Can Help

Citizen watch initiative will help ensure funds reach those who need it.
  •  A man fans flames on a fire in Tanauan on November 19, 2013 in Leyte, Philippines. (Photo: Dan Kitwood/copyright Getty Images)
  • Aerial view of a demolished coastal town on Eastern Samar Island on November 14, 2013 in Leyte, Philippines. (Photo: Dan Kitwood/copyright Getty Images)
  • Children walk underneath a tanker which ran aground and came to rest amongst debris in Tacloban on November 17, 2013 in Leyte, Philippines. (Photo: Dan Kitwood/copyright Getty Images)
  • A man sits outside his home, the only one left standing in a particularly badly damaged area of Tacloban.  (Photo: Dan Kitwood/copyright Getty Images)
  • Children play basketball at sunset in Tacloban on November 21, 2013 in Leyte, Philippines. (Photo: Dan Kitwood/copyright Getty Images)
  • Young residents push a cart as they collect water in an area destroyed in the aftermath of Typhoon Haiyan on November 18, 2013 in Tacloban. (Photo: Kevin Frayer/copyright Getty Images)
  • A boy plays a guitar in the hull of a tanker that was washed ashore in a particularly badly damaged part of Tacloban. November 19, 2013. (Photo: Dan Kitwood/copyright Getty Images)
  • An aerial view of the devastated district of Palo in the aftermath of Typhoon Haiyan on November 18, 2013 in Tacloban.  (Photo: Kevin Frayer/copyright Getty Images)
  • A man sleeps in the control room of a tanker in a particularly badly damaged part of Tacloban on November 18, 2013 in Leyte, Philippines. (Photo: Dan Kitwood/copyright Getty Images)
  • Children light candles in the Cathedral of Our Lord's Transfiguration Parish, Palo church which has been converted into a shelter for displaced people on November 17, 2013 in Leyte, Philippines. (Photo: Dan Kitwood/copyright Getty Images)
  • Bodies in a mass grave on the outskirts of Tacloban City on November 20, 2013 in Leyte.  (Photo: Chris McGrath/copyright Getty Images)
  • A child holds a placard asking for help by the side of the coastal road on November 22, 2013 in Eastern Samar, Philippines. (Photo: Dan Kitwood/copyright Getty Images)
 
 
 
 
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For more information about the project, contact IWPR Asia Director Alan Davis

Millions of dollars of aid are being donated to the Philippines in the wake of Super Typhoon Haiyan. How can donors around the world know that their money is actually benefiting those in need?

The Institute for War & Peace Reporting has been working in the Philippines since 2006. Three days after Typhoon Haiyan caused massive damage and took thousands of lives, IWPR and its three local partner organisations launched a citizen action campaign to help ensure that not a single cent or centavo donated gets lost as a result of corruption.

IWPR launched its first anti-corruption project in the Philippines in 2010, and this year, with the help of the European Union, we launched the Citizen Action Network for Accountability, or CANA for short.

CANA battles corruption simply but with amazing impact. It provides ordinary Filipino citizens with the tools and knowledge they need to understand, monitor and engage in decisions related to public fiscal issues and spending. The result of this kind of citizen involvement is a major reduction in corruption.

Last week, as part of CANA's ongoing activities, we launched Yolanda Citizen Watch. (Yolanda is the local name for Typhoon Haiyan.)

While the rescue effort will soon be over, recovery and rehabilitation for the millions of people affected will take years. Yolanda Citizen Watch and IWPR will be helping to make sure all the money pledged goes where it should.

For more information about Yolanda Citizen Watch, CANA and what IWPR is doing in the Philippines, please visit citizenaction.net, transparencyreporting.net and facebook.com/yolandacitizenwatch.

For more information about the project, contact IWPR Asia Director Alan Davis.