Central Asia: 20 Years of Independence

 

As the Soviet Union broke up in 1991, the five Central Asian republics suddenly found themselves independent states, facing numerous challenges in creating a sense of nationhood and building separate economic structures. To mark the two decades since the five new states came into being, IWPR is publishing a series of articles highlighting the common challenges facing them, and some of the ways in which their paths have diverged over the years.

Chinese trucks bringing consumer goods into Kyrgyzstan via the Irkeshtam crossing. (Photo: Kindsir/Flickr)
Central Asia 20 Years On
21 Dec 11
Moscow will find it hard to claw back former economic dominance as China moves into Central Asian region.
Crossing-point between Uzbekistan and Tajikistan. (Photo: Nozim Kalandarov)
Central Asia 20 Years On
15 Dec 11
Political tensions, trade rules and simple corruption make travel between Central Asian states a complex and unpleasant business.
A wedding in Tajikistan.  (Photo: IWPR)
Central Asia 20 Years On
13 Dec 11
Polygamy now so commonplace that some say legalising it might be best option.
Central Asia 20 Years On
9 Dec 11
More restrictive legislation on the way, experts warn.
Central Asia 20 Years On
9 Dec 11
Top-line economic indicators look good, but broader picture is less appealing.
John Schoeberlein. (Photo: D. Dalton Bennett/Sons of Hedin)
Central Asia 20 Years On
7 Dec 11
Managing succession when veteran leaders leave the stage is greatest risk factor for region's stability, leading American expert says.